Tag Archives: fisherman’s rib

Pants Progress, Books, and Baby Toys

My fuzzy pants are now a whopping 3.5″ in length.  Now, you’ll say, “But how did you manage to accomplish so much when you have so many other things going on right now?”  I know, it’s impressive.

On a serious note, or to make myself feel better about things, I feel the need to point out that these things are now 53 rows long so they do have nearly 10,000 stitches in them so far.  The Fisherman’s Rib that I’m using has all knit stitches taken in the stitch below, so it gathers up in length as you go.  It makes for a very thick, fluffy, and warm fabric, but it takes for-freaking-ever.  I’ve known this pattern for so long that I can’t remember learning it, which probably means that it’s one that Granny taught me before I was 10 years old.

Fisherman’s Rib:
For a fabric with a 1 st wide selvage, cast on an odd number of stitches 1-2 more than needed for gauge.
Prep row (wrong side):  P2, *K1, P1* to last stitch, P1
Row 1: K1, *K1 through the lower loop, P1* to last two stitches, K1 through the lower loop, K1
Row 2: P2, *K1 through the lower loop, P1* to last stitch, P1
Repeat rows 1 and 2 until desired length is reached.

Without a selvage, this stitch pattern looks the same on both sides except for the prep row, so it’s great for fold-over cuffs, etc.  I like the long tail cast on for this since it works so nicely with the prep row’s initial and final purl stitches, and provides a stable but stretchy base for the rib.

In other news, Knit Picks has a sale going right now on books, so I picked up The Knitter’s Book of Yarn and The Knitter’s Book of Wool, both by Clara Parkes. I checked them out from the library a few weeks ago and decided that I need them in my collection. I can’t recommend them highly enough. The illustrations are wonderful (imagine line drawings of angora rabbits, alpacas, spinning equipment, fiber close-ups) and they’re full of pertinent information and photographs of different fibers and yarns. There’s even a pattern section with discussion on why each yarn was chosen for that particular pattern.

I also grabbed Knitted Lace of Estonia by Nancy Bush, because I’ve been coveting Queen Silvia or Crown Prince for several years now. I even have 2500 yards of 2-ply baby alpaca lace weight on hand.

The final piece of news is that I firmly decided on Hazel the Humpback Whale to knit for a friend’s baby due in late May, and I ordered some more Knit Picks Stroll in Midnight Heather and Dove Heather. Now to get past the idea of intarsia… This Ravelry project shows the lighter colors stiched over by hand, which I think sounds less painful that intarsia. (I really, really, really hate intarsia.) I’m also considering just using double knitting; it might make for a thicker, sturdier fabric, and I think the color work would be easier. The last time that I tried double knitting was more than a decade ago, but it turned out very nice.

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