Tag Archives: estonian lace

Accomplishments

The nupp count on my lace scarf is up to 100.

My apartment is clean enough that I think my parents will have enough room when they arrive tomorrow.

Hazel is still moving very slow because I can’t bring her to the
studio to work on (that would ruin the surprise) but I have her color fully charted.

Now I’m off to a photoshoot where I get to wear a pretty, hooped platter tutu, then teaching, then knitting club at the studio.

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Sabbatical?

I can’t claim to have been ridiculously busy since I last wrote, but I have done some things. The lack of writing is more due to the spotty internet at my apartment and my still-unhappy laptop keyboard that makes bringing my laptop elsewhere to write uncomfortable since it necessitates not only my laptop but also that pesky (i.e. huge) USB keyboard.

Things that happened:

  • My grandmother turned 80 and went down to Mexico to celebrate. That’s an interesting story all on its own, which I may put in another post. Don’t worry, though, she’s safely back home now.
  • We had the first real snow storm of the year, and then an almost-blizzard. We only got 6 inches of snow each time, and never got real blizzard conditions, but just south of town the roads were awful and they had to close the highway for a full 12 hours. I love living on the great plains.
  • The almost-blizzard meant that we had a snow day, so I didn’t have to substitute in a 3-year-old class. I really don’t like teaching 3-year-old classes.
  • I did teach many more private lessons than usual, which is good for my finances, but bad for my free time.
  • I had a master class with James Sewell through my company, which was wonderful.
  • I started on The Great Apartment Re-Organization of 2012. I’ve been doing a little every day, and things are slowly starting to take shape. My biggest accomplishment is that my dance shoes and accessories are all organized, and so are my tights. Everything was in there before, but now it’s in order.
  • I continued with progress on my various projects.

First up is my awesome dance stuff organiation:

My Blackberry Bramble Beret is coming along, with just the very top to complete. I got a lot done on it during full-cast rehearsals, and I’m now in the final stretches. Of course, this means that the pattern is no longer totally predictable with the way that the cables and decreases come together, so it’s gotten harder to bring it to rehearsals.

To that end, I started Queen Silvia from Nancy Bush’s “Knitted Lace of Estonia”. I’m using my 2-ply superfine alpaca laceweight from Dharma Trading Company. I can’t even begin to express how soft this yarn is. I thought that the ball of yarn was soft, but it’s so much better knitted up! It has just the right amount of halo to make it a bit fluffy without distracting from the lace pattern.

I also picked up several more books from Knit Picks during their sale:
200 Fair Isle Motifs” by Mary Jane Mucklestone
100 Flowers to Knit & Crochet” by Lesley Stanfield
75 Birds Butterflies & little beasts to knit and crochet” by Lesley Stanfield

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Pants Progress, Books, and Baby Toys

My fuzzy pants are now a whopping 3.5″ in length.  Now, you’ll say, “But how did you manage to accomplish so much when you have so many other things going on right now?”  I know, it’s impressive.

On a serious note, or to make myself feel better about things, I feel the need to point out that these things are now 53 rows long so they do have nearly 10,000 stitches in them so far.  The Fisherman’s Rib that I’m using has all knit stitches taken in the stitch below, so it gathers up in length as you go.  It makes for a very thick, fluffy, and warm fabric, but it takes for-freaking-ever.  I’ve known this pattern for so long that I can’t remember learning it, which probably means that it’s one that Granny taught me before I was 10 years old.

Fisherman’s Rib:
For a fabric with a 1 st wide selvage, cast on an odd number of stitches 1-2 more than needed for gauge.
Prep row (wrong side):  P2, *K1, P1* to last stitch, P1
Row 1: K1, *K1 through the lower loop, P1* to last two stitches, K1 through the lower loop, K1
Row 2: P2, *K1 through the lower loop, P1* to last stitch, P1
Repeat rows 1 and 2 until desired length is reached.

Without a selvage, this stitch pattern looks the same on both sides except for the prep row, so it’s great for fold-over cuffs, etc.  I like the long tail cast on for this since it works so nicely with the prep row’s initial and final purl stitches, and provides a stable but stretchy base for the rib.

In other news, Knit Picks has a sale going right now on books, so I picked up The Knitter’s Book of Yarn and The Knitter’s Book of Wool, both by Clara Parkes. I checked them out from the library a few weeks ago and decided that I need them in my collection. I can’t recommend them highly enough. The illustrations are wonderful (imagine line drawings of angora rabbits, alpacas, spinning equipment, fiber close-ups) and they’re full of pertinent information and photographs of different fibers and yarns. There’s even a pattern section with discussion on why each yarn was chosen for that particular pattern.

I also grabbed Knitted Lace of Estonia by Nancy Bush, because I’ve been coveting Queen Silvia or Crown Prince for several years now. I even have 2500 yards of 2-ply baby alpaca lace weight on hand.

The final piece of news is that I firmly decided on Hazel the Humpback Whale to knit for a friend’s baby due in late May, and I ordered some more Knit Picks Stroll in Midnight Heather and Dove Heather. Now to get past the idea of intarsia… This Ravelry project shows the lighter colors stiched over by hand, which I think sounds less painful that intarsia. (I really, really, really hate intarsia.) I’m also considering just using double knitting; it might make for a thicker, sturdier fabric, and I think the color work would be easier. The last time that I tried double knitting was more than a decade ago, but it turned out very nice.

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